"

Salmon, salmon and salmon
  |  First Published: August 2014



In these southern waters at this time of the year the common word is salmon, and right now the chant is loud and clear.

Right along the coast schools of the torpedo fish have been arriving and individual fish are up to 5kg. Actually they are not a true salmon but a member of the herring family and best-eaten fresh. They are very healthy being high in omega acids. The name came from the European settlers who noticed a likeness between the appearances of the species with their true salmon.

Information from the local boat storage is that although the big schools have not yet arrived in the traditional numbers there have been plenty of individual fish that have been to the 4kg mark making an appearance. Jim Davidson and a couple of mates decided to try their luck inside the entrance and could only manage a couple of fish after plenty of work. They then decided to try their luck outside the entrance, as the weather conditions were ideal with no wind. They had quite a few marks and after a fair bit of work had a very reasonable bag of salmon with the best bringing the scales down to 3.14kg. They also had a sprinkling of other fish that included flathead and silver trevally that were caught on pilchard baits, and one huge stingray that put up a tremendous fight. After the battle the big fellow was released to swim and fight another day.

Also out wide there have been very good size kingfish being bagged. They are taking a variety of baits and experienced boaters do very well with the use of mirrors. The reason why this method is so successful is unknown and only guesses are suggested, but at the end of the day, who cares as long as they work!

There have been reports of good size flathead being caught off the jetties along with garfish, silver trevally and unusually big mullet. For some reason the big mullet have been turning up almost everywhere.

Again information from the boat storage at Port Welshpool, which could account for the small number of reports is the fact that there have not been many boats on the water. Having said that there is no reason, apart from the cold water why there are not worthwhile numbers of whiting in the Lewis Channel, which flows past the long jetty. The best time has been on the last half of the run out tide where whiting are usually in good numbers being to the 37cm mark, which makes the effort worthwhile.

At Yanakie, on the other side of the inlet, there have been quite reasonable reports given the time of year where the water temperature is way down to winter levels. Lachie Roberts runs the local caravan park and says that flathead seems to be the main catch and although not all that big, they are well over size and in very good numbers. There is also a sprinkling of silver trevally and quality mullet as well as snook and Lachie says that a visit to the area would not be wasted. A boat is not essential as the beach has been giving up flathead, salmon and the occasional gummy shark that are taking a variety of baits.

Port Albert is located a short distance to the east and the place to enquire is the General Store, which is run by Rob and Ulla Killury. The store is located on the foreshore and there is a gantry installed to weigh in those whopper fish for bragging rights along with scales for the smaller varieties. There is also a camera available, also for bragging rights.

Rob says that outside the entrance there have been quite reasonable numbers of snapper and gummies being caught in around the 20m mark that are taking pilchards, squid and silver fish. At the time of this report there had been a very good run of weather, which is unusual for this area but no one was complaining and with any sort of luck the good fishing will continue.

Inside the inlet there have been good numbers of salmon to 4kg making an appearance as well as gummies, flathead and reasonable size pinkies. The jetties have been popular as far as local and holidaymakers have been concerned. Big eels are making up respectable bags along with silver trevally, mullet and flathead.

With any sort of luck the good times will continue but the weather is unpredictable in this part of the world.

Reads: 536

Matched Content ... powered by Google




Latest Articles




Fishing Monthly Magazines On Instagram

Digital Editions

Read Digital Editions

Current Magazine - Editorial Content

Victoria Fishing Monthly
New South Wales Fishing Monthly
Queensland Fishing Monthly