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From the editor
  |  First Published: May 2010



A quick look at the calendar reveals that it’s now 12 months since I’ve taken on the role as editor.

Time flies when you are having fun!

In the last 12 months a lot has happened – not least of which is a return to reasonable rainfall in Victoria and Tasmania.

Government departments continue to make questionable decisions on angling access and species management. The mako shark issue is a case in point, and the insane meddling around with Werribee River access continues to confound everyday anglers who just want to go fishing.

As we run up to a Victorian state election and the Federal election in the wings, we need to keep our angling issues to the forefront. On the state level bodies, such as VR Fish and to a lesser extent Future Fish, keep lobbying on our collective behalf.

On the national scene though we are very under-cooked with the imminent demise of RecFish. RecFish has had its funding pulled, eliminating the direct link between recreational anglers and the Federal Government.

Anglers generally take a dim view of this sort of thing, and as such a group of frustrated, yet influential recreational anglers are forging their way to forming a national unity group of anglers to raise the broad issues of getting a fair go and being treated with some respect by government.

The major issues being confronted by WE FISH affect all anglers, such as the banning of taking mako and porbeagle sharks in Commonwealth waters, the increasing spread of Marine National Parks, and the demise of RecFish without adequate consultation or sound scientific reasoning. WE FISH seek to represent all anglers; freshwater or saltwater, and is not about any singular issue.

Founding member of WE FISH, prominent fishing media identity Al McGlashan has urged all anglers to get active and not remain apathetic if we want to be taken seriously by government. McGlashan advises that there are a number of ways to get involved and be heard; joining the Facebook page dedicated to the cause, writing letters to politicians as well as getting involved with petitions.

The group plans to deliver a petition to Canberra prior to the next federal election to make the major political parties realise that the recreation anglers of Australia demand to be consulted with and that they are discerning voters.

Petitions can be found in participating tackle stores and more information can be found online at www.victoriansaltwaterfishing.com

Onto more pleasant things and for the flyfishing nuts out there (of which I am one), the RISE Flyfishing Film Festival is on again.

This is the world's largest fishing film festival, and festival organiser Nick Reygard does a wonderful job as both curator and filmmaker.

Throughout July and August, cinema audiences will be shown a selection of stunning fly fishing films from Broome, New Zealand, Mexico, California and Iceland, all presented in crystal-clear high definition on the big screen. The emphasis is on exotic destinations, epic adventures, big fish and stunning cinematography.

The festival will play in Melbourne, Launceston, Hobart and a number of regional towns in Victoria and Tasmania. Check out www.gin-clear.com for more information.

This issue of the magazine is the last for one of our regular contributors, Lucas Smith. Lucas has been doing the Lakes Entrance report with great enthusiasm and we all wish him well on his new adventure at Melville Island.

On the subject of area reports, we will soon be further expanding our network of regional writers to provide even more coverage across these two great states – stay tuned for more on this.

This issue also has a massive feature in time for the Melbourne Boat Show – this year’s show promises to be huge.

We will be there with another amazing subscription offer and would love to chat to as many readers as possible. The next best thing to fishing is reading and talking about it, so we look forward to seeing you at the show.

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