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10 land-based spots
  |  First Published: April 2010



I have had a number of emails from readers requesting more land-based spots in the southern Sydney so here are 10 good ones to try.

• Port Hacking – Flathead – Jibbon Beach

This area usually works pretty well during or just after a southerly blow.

It doesn’t seem to matter whether you fish near the bottom of the tide or the top because most of the area has a sandy bottom.

Try a paternoster rig, but put the sinker on the snood normally reserved for second hook, not the bottom one.

Early low or late light periods are better.

If using soft plastics you will need to fan your casts to find fish.

Port Hacking - Dee Ban Spit - Whiting/flathead

Fish for whiting on the eastern side of the sand spit during the Summer on a run-out tide with beach worms, sand worms tube or blood worms.

This is a good place to learn how to use soft plastics for flathead because there are no snags.

Fish here during and just after a big sea, where the whitewater will harbour salmon and tailor.

Port Hacking - Bass – Audley

Fish near the bottom of the tide or the top of the tide. Big eddies can form here when the tide runs, making it hard to keep a bait near the bottom.

A paternoster rig or a float will allow the bait to be suspended off the bottom. Early and late in the day are better times.

After a couple of days of rain it is worth trying live garden worms or PowerBait. Lures should have a lot of vibration, rattles or be bright in colour. Work the eastern shoreline from the weir to the first corner in the north.

Port Hacking Swallow Rock/Deer Park – Flathead

Fish the top of the tide; the area is fairly shallow at low tide.

Use a paternoster rig or a float to suspend a live poddy mullet off the bottom.

After a couple of days of rain it is worth trying live garden worms or Power Bait.

Wattamolla Rocks – Salmon

Fish from the front rocks only when the seas are low, with a minimum 10kg line and a twin-hook, snooded rig.

Live bait can be gathered inside the small bay to the north or out the front.

Bread or soaked chicken pellets in a plastic bucket or onion bag will suffice for berley.

Try a balloon for a float, but don’t blow it up to big. Apply Vaseline to the line to help it float away.

The point just to the south is good in a southerly wind.

Wonga Road Wharf, Yowie Bay –Squid

It doesn’t seem to matter here whether the tide is falling or rising but night is best. Take three different-sized jigs in three different colours and work them on a slow retrieve. Berley works well here.

Coalcliff Point – Kingfish

Fish from the rocks only when the seas are down. Live bait can be gathered inside the bay or out the front and this is a good place to berley.

Fish with a minimum 20kg line and take a long-handled gaff, there are not many places to land big fish without one

If seas are up you can fish the back of the bay.

Kurnell Point – Kingfish

Try places like just west of Pig Rock, Little Yena and Yena a few days before or after the full moon with live yellowtail, slimy mackerel, tailor or squid, or you can use poppers or soft plastics.

Berley for live bait with mashed pilchards.

You will need some whitewater here but not too much because the swell can come up over the rocks at these places.

• Cape Banks –Kingfish

No good in a southerly swell, this area is best fished after the swell has abated for a couple of days

Take berley to attract live yellowtail, garfish, mullet, pike, squid and slimy mackerel. If you don’t get any, try suspending strip baits of squid, cuttlefish, pike or garfish.

Look for deeper water in close and suspend a bait under a bobby cork or a balloon.

Tom Uglys and Captain Cooks bridges – mulloway

Use whole or half pilchards, whitebait, mullet, strips of tailor, yellowtail or slimy mackerel or Hawkesbury prawns on a two-hook ganged rig for smaller mulloway or a four-hook ganged rig for larger fish.

Tide doesn’t seem to matter, as long as it is running.

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