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Fortune Favours The Brave
  |  First Published: July 2011



June was a good month on the northwest, although it was tough to brave some of the weather we endured.

But those who did where treated by regular visits from a few species. Gummy sharks were being caught from both boats and beaches. With the assistance of a few warm jackets you can brave the cold nights and catch these fish from many coastal beaches.

There is also a chance of a Port Jackson shark being a by-catch as there is many about in between the gummies.

Australian salmon

There will be a few smaller salmon in the rivers along the coast, but if you are looking for some bigger models, then head to the Marrawah area on the west coast and focus on Sinking Rock and Netley Bay.

These areas are renowned for big salmon, and these can be caught using a surf rod with bait and a surf popper.

It is always a good addition to cast lures like silver wobblers and soft plastics with large jig heads. This can be deadly and there is nothing like a nice salmon on some lighter spinning gear to get the heart racing.

Back to the populated areas, and you will also see some more species around such as mullet and silver trevally. These can be found in many estuaries and are great fun for the whole family.

WHATS TO COME?

July means that there is still another month to wait until trout season opens again.

There is still something that you can do to soften the withdrawal symptoms of the fishing addiction.

There are some lakes open all year round that can be productive; lakes Barrington and Burbury are all year round lakes located on the North-West Coast, both of which have produced some good fishing in the past months.

This is especially so at Lake Barrington, with some very big Atlantic salmon and plenty of trout being plucked from the lake.

Lake Burbury would also be an option, but I wouldn’t be driving from too far away to get to it, as it tends to get more active later on in the season.

As for the salt water there will be much the same action going on as we come into July, mostly good-sized Australian salmon.

As always in this slow, cold period for fishing, there is nothing better than getting in touch with your fishing by sitting inside nice and warm and tying some flies, doing some maintenance on reels and rods and other tackle or even just a bit of research.

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